Product Detail: Simple Glass Planters

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Succulents in a Bottle

Succulents in a Bottle

Simple Glass Planters

Broccoli, Basil

Broccoli, Basil

Did you water that plant? Simple gardening ideas for kids of all ages. You do have a green thumb.

The recommended glass jar is a former pasta sauce jar. They tend to have large openings to make assembly and watering easy. The broccoli and basil were made using soup jars. Using tinted glass works also, but keep the direct sun to a few hours per day max (partial shade). Straws or other tube structures can be used to make watering jars like beer bottles (with small openings) efficient. Allow for stems to grow past narrow gaps without being crowded by soil. Fill in the wider part of the narrow opening of a bottle with rocks to allow water time to make its way down. The air trapped below makes the process slow. Adding straws release the air while allowing water to fill the bottle. Use at least two straws, one or more cut level to the top of the rocks. Use all but one short straw to add water. That straw will be the air exhaust. You can use a water-permiable barrier between the dirt and the rocks to make the rocks more visible. Tulle works very well, as shown in the above bottles growing jade. Large leaves work also, but will degrade over time. The tulle will not.

Basil

Basil

Broccoli Jumps To a Second Jar

Broccoli Jumps To a Second Jar

The Explanation: Simple Glass Planters

Designed to mitigate heat issues! In fact, by using the heat generated by sun, the plant is watered. The sun heats the dirt first because it is a dark color. The heat is trapped in the glass with the water and some rocks for temperature stabilization and drainage. The head makes the water evaporate. It condenses on the sides of the glass because the air outside the glass has not been heated and trapped like that inside. Not only does the plant get its water from this convection effect, but also the dirt is cooled by the condensed water that drips on it from above and the side. The exposure to UV light from the sun also keeps the water clean and the roots healthy. Exposing roots that were previously in dirt to the sun will kill them. Allowing roots to slowly grow into areas that get sun makes the plant hardier. Additionally, it is easy to see when the plant needs some water.


Roots Grow Into The Sun

Roots Grow Into The Sun

Broccoli Without its Second Jar

Broccoli Without its Second Jar


Instructions on Making Your Own Simple Glass Planters

Supplies:


Clean out your jar and add 1-2 inches of rocks (or marbles, etc) at the bottom. Fill the rest of the jar with dirt. Add your plant or seeds to the dirt at the top. Add water to the jar until it reaches about an inch into the dirt. Re-water when jar appears empty of water. Once the plant gets big you can add water to the top of the jar. The amount of dirt and water a plant needs depends on what type of plant it is. Herbs like basil want alot of soil, but not as much as tomatoes. Broccoli, pumkins and squash like their roots spread out, but still need alot of soil. Succulents need very little soil and very little water. The fancy jar planters containing jade are assembled to hold enough water for at least one year depending on the amount of light. They shows straws that run from the rim of the jar down into the rocks. This allows for easy, quick refill of the water area, but is not necessary, just handy. Jade is a succulent so its roots will take a long time to grow into all the soil in the jar. The jar is sized so that the jade will grow very large. I have not had to add any water to the jade bottle since filling it when it was planted, and it has been over one year. Let me know how your version fares!

Jade After One Year in Fancy Jar

Jade After One Year in Fancy Jar

Bushy Basil

Bushy Basil